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Changes to the myIR login screen are coming You will not be able to use myIR between 1pm Saturday 8 October and 8am Monday 10 October. This is so we can update our external authentication system. From Monday 10 October the myIR login page will have a new look and feel, but the login process will not change.

Cost of Living Payment Eligible customers will have the payment automatically paid into their bank accounts by the end of the day 3 October 2022. The payments will be staggered and Credit Union customers may not receive their payment until 4 October 2022. Cost-of-Living-Payment

Fringe benefit tax (FBT) is a tax payable when the following benefits are supplied to the employees or shareholder-employees:

  • motor vehicles available for private use
  • low interest/interest free loans
  • free, subsidised or discounted goods and services
  • employer contributions to sick, accident or death benefit funds, superannuation schemes and specified insurance policies (excluding employer contributions to superannuation schemes liable for ESCT (formerly SSCWT)
  • unclassified fringe benefits.

This is different to when you pay your employees. Where you pay cash to your employees, you treat the payment as part of the employee's salary or wage and make normal employee deductions, such as PAYE.

If these benefits are enjoyed or received by employees as a result of their employment, they are liable for FBT. This could be in a past, present or even future employment. Employers pay tax on benefits provided to employees or shareholder-employees, even if the benefits are provided through another person/entities. Employers also pay FBT if the benefits are provided to or enjoyed by associates of the employees or shareholder employees.

There are exemptions to FBT.

Fringe benefit tax for charities

Employer provided motor vehicles for private use

Entertainment expenses

Some entertainment expenses may be subject to fringe benefit tax (FBT) if they are enjoyed or received by employees.

Entertainment expenses

 

Last updated: 23 Dec 2020
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